Waldemar Psylander danish movie star in Budapest, 1915 (Wikipedia)
The entire world can be found in a few acres of land – reported Az Est from Copenhagen, the location of one of the most significant film companies of the era, the Danish Nordisk. Upon the outbreak of war, French and Italian filmmaking dominated Europe, with a significant influence even across the Atlantic, however, thanks to Nordisk, Danish films were also noted among the best. read more...
A. J. P. Taylor
What caused the First World War, the "seminal catastrophe" of the 20th century? Perhaps no historical question has so much literature than the outbreak of the First World War. One of the most original answers were provided by A. J. P. Taylor (1906–1990), who had less research in the archives, but he thought so much more: the first and most renowned British "media historian" even today explained his shocking "timetable theory" in several works: it starts from the basic assumption that people are unwilling to believe – that "large events have minor reasons". read more...
Sitting Bull and Buffalo Bill (William Notman studios,1895)
News on the death of a Russian and an American myth reached Hungary approximately at the same time: Az Est nevertheless noted that we should not be sure we would not hear about them any more. „No one knows whether Buffalo Bill lives or died after all. Since the large-bearded colonel has already died and resurrected several times. The competition was constant between him and Rasputin in this field. This week they finally achieved a tie." read more...
Military dance of Wilson (Borsszem Jankó, 18/02/1917)
In the spring of 1917, a new continent joined the Great War, so the world of the world war was complete. The USA tried to remain neutral in the first years of the war, however, anti-German sentiments of the American public came to the fore by 1917. The administration led by President Wilson even considered that a real say in the new world order could be achieved by participating in the war. read more...
John Keegan - The Face of Battle
"Death is a vulgar and stinky thing without any poetry" - wrote Ignotus in his necrology of Sándor Bródy, but the quote could also be the motto of recollections about the Battle of the Somme. After four and a half months of killing and the death of 1.2 million people, the front got only 11 kilometres closer to Berlin, i.e. more than a hundred soldiers were lost per each meter. Traditional military historiography using neutral and distancing expressions could not depict the reality of the battle that has become the synonym of meaningless bloodshed, until the arrival of John Keegan, renewing military historiography, who presented the true "face" of the Battle of the Somme in his book The face of the battle, published in 1976. read more...
The Anno Movie Club discussed the most moving episode of the trench warfare of WWI, the common front Christmas of those soldiers who had been killing each other for months after the film ‘Joyeux Noël’. Why did the court-martial sentence a cat to death? What was the football match on no-man’s-land like? read more...
The Anno Movie Club of the Institute of Political History was opened with the film The White Ribbon. The film refers to the monstrosities of WWI only by displaying the ill repressions and inhumanities that occurred in a small closed village. read more...