1916 – the last year of the “old era” (Conference in the Institute of Political History, 05-10-2016)
On November 21, 1916 Franz Josef died and according to the trope, with his departure an era ended. Lajos Zilahy wrote, the death of the emperor in the middle of the War was “as if a rusty metal door of a dark cellar closed.” But was it really like this? Partly based on the Political History Institute’s conference on “1916 – The last year of the old era and the old Hungary?” I shall sum up what were the most significant changes of possibly the bloodiest year of the War from a military, economic, social and cultural point of view, and whether it was ground-breaking or not. read more...
The international scientific conference ’Memory and Memorialization of WWI in East Central Europe: Past and Present’ of the Institute of Political History focused on the questions of historiography, history teaching and collective memory. read more...
“He is like to be born in 1916, he would never have to wage war” – this sentence is told in the Italian film The Great War about a one-year old child. This proved to be naive hope. Anno Movie Club screened and discussed the 1959 film of Mario Monicelli. read more...
The British documentary film about The battle of the Somme was a real blockbuster, but it did not mention the fact that 400 thousand British, 200 thousand French and 450 German soldiers died to push the frontline 5 kilometres further. “Greeting cards” thrown with bombs and pen campaign in London against the coward. Geoffrey Malins’ and John McDowwell’s silent film in the Anno Movie Club. read more...
Cowardice, denial of commands, desertion were the reasons of execution of several thousand soldiers by their own side in WWI. The French once decimated one of their units, but this ruthless means of disciplining troops was most often applied in the Monarchy. The Anno Movie Club presented Stanley Kubrick’s The Paths of Glory.  read more...
The Battle of Gallipoli contributed to the birth of the Australian, New-Zealand and the Turkish nation. The Anno Movie Club screened Peter Weir’s Gallipoli. read more...
The Anno Movie Club discussed the most moving episode of the trench warfare of WWI, the common front Christmas of those soldiers who had been killing each other for months after the film ‘Joyeux Noël’. Why did the court-martial sentence a cat to death? What was the football match on no-man’s-land like? read more...