Though in June 1918 Pesti Hírlap still published reassuring news about the alleged remission of the Spanish influenza pandemic, later named Spanish flu, a month later authorities admitted that the disease had appeared in the Hungarian capital as well. As it later turned out, the majority of contemporary news depicted the reality much better, and the flu caused mass illnesses around the world. In Budapest, in the summer of 1918, the virus, which had mainly infected soldiers and prisoners of war, already spread among the civilian population too. read more...
„The death notice of capitalism” – this is how, at the beginning of the fifth year of the war, Népszava described the series of data published by the German Wolff news agency. Wishful thinking – the paper wished for this indeed: they wished for writing the death notice of capitalism. But regardless of how much the majority of left-wingers waited for the collapse of capitalism in the 20th century, it did not disappear from the scene even despite the most brutal bloodsheds – either after World War I, or after World War II. read more...
140-150 thousand soldiers of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy were killed, imprisoned or wounded senselessly in the days after June 15, 1918, in northern Italy along Piave. The last attack of the Austro-Hungarian army in the World War was broken down for several reasons: one of the main factors was the disintegration of the hinterland. read more...
By April-May 1918, the Monarchy's reserves started to run out. In addition to food and financial resources, this also meant the people. And mostly: spiritual reserves – soldiers rebelled, nationalities were stirred, workers got organized. The Czechs have almost had independence celebrations in Prague.  read more...
A hundred years ago, on May 31, 1918, Feminists attacked Sándor Wekerle, the Prime Minister when leaving the Parliement for why they have rejected the proposal on women suffragette in the electoral committee. Wekerle promised to submit an amendment proposal and held to this promise in July, read more...
Troops of the Austrian-Hungarian Monarchy showed signs of disintegration in May-July 1918. News of protests – would – have been received from Judenburg to Pécs, from Rimaszombat to Rumburg – if the press was allowed to report it. But "simple" order refusals, shooting officers (even regimental commanders) from trains, looting and desertion also grew in number. read more...
The Hungarian government shifted towards a more conservative direction in the last year of the world war and sought to moderate the strengthening labour movement. Inspite of this, in the spring of 1918, the central paper of the Social Democrat party, Népszava managed to achieve a change in the exchange of fat tickets, since the previous routine led to an unsustainable situation, queuing at night and at dawn, and even the armed forces were deployed against women "queuing for fat". read more...
Central powers signed the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk with Russia on March 3, 1918. Russia lost 780 thousand square kilometres of land and 56 million inhabitants, but made peace temporarily. This supported the consolidation of Bolshevik rule. The Germans won in the short term, but the Bolsheviks strengthened in the long run – for a price though: Brest-Litovsk could also be a symbol of breaking up with the West, the Entente. read more...
On January 8, 1918, US President Woodrow Wilson presented the principles of postwar settlement in his congressional speech. The USA entered the First World War only in 1917,  and thereby Wilson partly also tried to convince the Americans that the United States was fighting for noble purposes. However, only a few of the 14 points of Wilson were implemented and, even so, they were not used for too noble purposes.   read more...
International Women's Day was not always held on March 8, traditions of this this modern-day celebration are extremely complicated. For example, in Hungary, in the last three years of the First World War, celebrations took place on different dates, one of the programmes was even organized on 1 April. read more...
From Soviet times, the birthday of the Red Army was celebrated on February 23, though the first troops started to organize at the end of January 1918. The first military successes were seen at the end of February, when the Soviet-Russian army stopped the advancing Germans before they reached Petersburg. Many of the first commanders of the Red Army died in horrible circumstances – they were not killed by the enemy, but by the system that gained power with their help. read more...
In the last months of the First World War, there was little positive news and little permanent value generated in Hungary. However, the Museum of Fine Arts still held notable exhibitions and employed significant experts, one of whom was appointed to be a (subordinate) director in March 1918, even during these times.  read more...