In the last months of the First World War, there was little positive news and little permanent value generated in Hungary. However, the Museum of Fine Arts still held notable exhibitions and employed significant experts, one of whom was appointed to be a (subordinate) director in March 1918, even during these times.  read more...
The government seeking to govern without parliamentary majority, politicians betraying each other, parties being unable to compromise, arrested radicals – such a divided elite would destabilize a state even in peace times, but Hungary started the last year of the First World War with this political apparatus. read more...
It is still debated exactly what has happened, but it is known about the greatest revolt of the Monarchy's navy that in Hungary it was usually remembered reluctantly or in the wrong way – in many cases wrongly involving Horthy. However, in the South Slavic countries, experts have been extensively concerned with the mutiny of sailors even today. read more...
The club room at Aker köz of the atheist-materialist Galilei Circle, perhaps the most significant student association of Hungarian history, founded in 1908, was shut down 100 years ago, in January 1918. The reason was the illegal anti-militarist activity of some Galileists, which the Hungarian state "in trouble" responded to with a strong blow. However, Galilei Circle, reborn in the autumn of 1918, eventually survived "Old Hungary". read more...
Hungarian press was vigorously interested in the real purpose of the leader of the Russian Bolsheviks during the peace negotiations in Brest-Litovsk. An article of Az Est, published in January 1918, depicted a clear picture: it was not the agreement with the Germans that was important to Lenin, but social revolution. read more...
At the beginning of 1918, the Hungarian Ministry of Domestic Affairs wanted to take action to replace wartime blood loss. They primarily wished to persuade American Hungarians to return to their homeland to replace the horrific shortage of people. It is typical that German ship companies sought to grasp the business opportunity – but in vein. read more...
One of the inescapable stories of 1917 was the fall of the Tsarist system and the Russian Revolution. The reaction and the emergence of the Interim Government that replaced the tsarist government, embodying oppression, with the promise of a parliamentary system, created fear and hope at the same time – for all parties at war. read more...
Following the turns of the Russian revolution, the Tsar-ruled, but broadly autonomous Grand Duchy of Finland was also getting closer to independence. This was facilitated by the Bolshevik advent to power in St. Petersburg, which however increased domestic tensions. read more...
At the turn of 1917-1918, the relationship between the Hungarian government and the press became extremely frozen. Vilmos Vázsonyi, who criticized the government before the World War both as an opposition politician and a lawyer regarding (among others) press freedom,  especially the new press law adopted in the spring of 1914, now became the primary target of journalists as Justice Minister. In the following article, we will look at how the world could turn so huge that Vázsonyi, the champion of press freedom, became the suppressor thereof in half a year. read more...
The International Red Cross was established in the 19th century: seeing the horrors of the Solferino Battle in 1859, Henri Dunant (1828-1910), a Swiss businessman, decided to establish an aid organization consisting of volunteers who tend the wounded during the war. read more...
According to today's "half-official" interpretation in Hungary, on November 7, 1917, it was not a revolution, but a coup in Russia, performed by Lenin as an agent for the Germans, acting against his home country, completely in the interest of German war aims, infecting Russia as a virus.  read more...
"I came to Lake Balaton for a week / To sail and sunbathe / When a woman sat down beside me to play cards / That's what happened in Lelle." Though we are sure such romances took place on the shore of the Hungarian sea during the war too, people wishing to relax could not spend their time as carelessly at the lake as in happy times of peace – being on a holiday or not, holidaymakers were also affected by everyday challenges.  read more...